Saturday, April 3, 2010


People who do not drink enough water can easily develop bladder and kidney disorders due to the heavy concentration of urine that is passed.


It almost seems like a paradox. The bladder aids in the passing of fluid from our body. Yet, to remain healthy, it needs water. The urinary bladder is a hollow organ made up of elastic muscle fibers, which allow it to expand without damage. Ordinarily, the bladder has the capacity to hold up to 750ml of fluid. According to the amount of fluid collected, pressure is exerted on the walls of the bladder and, as it mounts, this triggers the feeling of needing to pass water, or urinate. A bladder infection (or urinary tract infections, UTI), caused by bacteria getting into the urine, creates the same urge, but often the patient is able to produce only a few drops of water while suffering pain and discomfort. This discomfort is avoidable. Drinking the recommended 6-8 glasses of water a day will keep the bladder active and bacteria-free. Also, avoiding coffee, tea, carbonated beverages and alcohol can help, as they irritate the bladder and cause a slight amount of bleeding to occur. When bleeding occurs, bacteria may enter the blood vessels.

If a UTI is left untreated or undetected, it can turn into a kidney infection, as the bladders is connected to the two kidneys through ureters. Both can be treated with antibiotics, but as the infection passes to the kidney, lower back pain may develop as well, making a need for pain medication. This leads us to kidneys.

Kidneys/Kidney Stones
While they don’t sound as important as the heart and lungs, kidneys are very important to our health. The kidneys, along with the liver and or urinary tract rid our body of waste materials. If the kidneys were to stop operating for only two days, it would cause retention of metabolic toxins, and then uremia would set in. The accumulation of waste products, normally excreted in the urine, would cause metabolic poisoning.

Build-up of bacteria and proteins can cause crystals to form, which are known as kidney stones. These are very painful to pass. Some studies show that dehydration increases the chances of having kidney stones, and drinking plenty of water may very well prevent the formation of them. People living in the south eastern United States may have more kidney stones than people living elsewhere, and it is thought that the cause may be related to temperature and dehydration

Avoiding situations or controlling the other diseases that contribute to kidney disorders may sometimes prevent chronic kidney disease, where patients may have to rely on a kidney machine for survival. The earlier a person can alter factors that damage the kidneys, the better. Among the ways to help prevent chronic kidney disease are:
1. Maintaining blood pressure at less than 130/85 mm Hg
2. Maintain strict blood glucose control in people with
3. Maintain healthy levels of fats (lipids), such as cholesterol and triglycerides
4. Stop smoking or using other tobacco products

But perhaps one of the easiest and most effective ways is to avoid dehydration. Dehydration is not only a symptom, but also the cause of many aliments, especially kidney infections and other disorders that can lead to more serious matters. If someone is prone to kidney and urinary ailments, they will want to avoid dehydration at all costs. People will want to drink at least 48 ounces of water per day, and will want to promptly treat any illnesses that cause dehydration, such as diarrhea, vomiting, or fever. During hot weather and exercise, it is even more important to replenish fluids that may have been lost through water and even the occasional sports drink. Also, they will want to avoid caffeinated beverages, such as coffee and colas. They increase urine output and dehydrate the body faster, as do alcoholic beverages. 

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